I am dedicating this page to help those just getting into engineering.  The following videos are short and cannot cover every part of a complicated subject, but they are a good start!  More to come!

F requency Training 

Frequency Training pt 1: "Sub Bass"

I refer to this band as the "sub-bass" and it covers 60 Hz and below.  Some elements that live within this band are: kick, 808, sub-synths, low notes of the bass guitar.  Too much of this range sounds too heavy, not enough sounds weak.

Frequency Training pt 2: "Bass"

I refer to this band as the "bass" and it ranges from 60 Hz to 100 Hz.  Some elements that live within this band are: kick (punch), floor tom, bass guitar.  Too much of this range sounds tubby or boomy, too litte sounds thin. 

Frequency Training pt 3: "Upper Bass"

 

 I refer to this band as the "upper bass" and it ranges from 100 Hz to 200 Hz.  Many elements have unwanted resonance in this range (and I spend a good amount of time on it): kick, toms, bass guitar, guitar, vocal.  Not enough of this range sounds thin, too much sounds muddy.

Frequency Training pt 4: "Low Mid"

 

I refer to this band as the "low-mid" and it ranges from 200 Hz to 500 Hz.  Some elements that live within this band are: vocal and guitar fundamentals, also resonances of acoustic guitar and drums.  Too much of this area sounds boxy or inflated, too little sounds scooped or wimpy.

Frequency Training pt 5: "Mid"

 

I refer to this band as the "mid" and it ranges from 500 Hz to 1 kHz.  Too much information in this area can sound honky, low-fi, papery, dry.  The right amount is a modern/wet sound.

Frequency Training pt 6: "Upper-Mid"

 

I refer to this band as the "upper-mid" and it ranges from 1 kHz to 3.5 kHz.  Human ears are very sensitive to this range.  Too much of this area sounds sharp and piercing, too little sounds distant and dark.

Frequency Training pt 7: "Presence"

 

I refer to this band as the "presence" and it ranges from 3.5 kHz to 8 kHz.  This range sounds good on just about everything because it adds life and polish.  Too much of this area sounds brittle and harsh, too little sounds dark and amateur.

Frequency Training pt 8: "Air"

 

I refer to this band as the "air" and it ranges from 8 kHz and up.  This range adds life and height to things.  This is also where the upper harmonics live. Too much of this range can blur other elements of a mix, too little sounds dull and boring.

Compression 

"Intro to Compression"

Compression is used to limit dynamic range of a signal.  Doing this enables elements of a mix to sound cohesive or "sit" together.

Compression circuits:

Different types of compression circuits have various applications: some are for gluing a mix, others are for compressing a snare.

Compression Settings pt 1:

An explanation of the threshold, ratio, and knee settings of a compressor.

Compression Settings pt 2

An explanation of the attack, release, and make-up gain settings of a compressor. 

Limiting:

An explanation of types of limiting and their uses.

Multi-band Compression:

An explanation and uses of multi-band compression.